Vlahos Keeps Family Tradition Alive as School Board Member

Brian Vlahos grew up in Roseville, California, a city of 128,000 just north of Sacramento. He watched his dad and grandfather successfully run small businesses and give back to the community that supported them, during thick and thin times. He learned about loyalty and a genuine concern for others.

Today, Vlahos is in a position to continue his family’s tradition through his professional and public service work. A 29-year member of the Northern California Carpenters Regional Council, Vlahos is a marketing and field rep for drywall/lather Local 9109, as well as being its president. He’s also a member of the Roseville City School District School Board.

“During the economic downturn, I saw an opportunity to help my community. It’s easy to step-up in good times, but much more challenging when things are tough, Vlahos added.

"It’s not easy to change the landscape of the city you call home, but I wanted to do my part in keeping what we have and still be able to move ahead and I believe as a construction worker with strong straight-line work ethics and approaches, I could give that to the school board, Vlahos said.

“I believe by being out in the community, helping people and including my union brothers and sisters to help me, it shows that we’re ordinary people just like anyone else.”

“I believe by being out in the community, helping people and including my union brothers and sisters to help me, it shows that we’re ordinary people just like anyone else. Too often, what people know about unions is what they see on Fox News. I want to demonstrate that union folks are hardworking middle class Americans, working hard to give their family a good quality of life and working toward a dignified retirement.”

Staying active in local politics has a direct benefit to the UBC, Vlahos believes.

“In political campaigns, people love to see the carpenters show up with people to walk precincts and make phone calls. And friends don’t forget that kind of help - it has a way of finding its way back. You may not always be able to draw a straight line between them but it's there in the belly of the political giant.”

His advice for other members looking to get started in politics? Predictable, based on his heritage: “Do it for the right reasons. Do it because you care about the community. Too often people start something but don’t finish it. If you’re going to do something, see it through, no matter how tough it gets.”